Spearfishing Competitions – 1976

SPEARFISHING COMPETITIONS

Dear Sir

I am the unrepentant hunter of fish, and manufacture equipment to hunt fish. I think most groups of spearfishermen ensure that their catch is eaten, that ecological principles are observed, and their sport is correctly enjoyed. Of prime importance is that the young are maturely guided – there is no generation gap between underwater buddies… (Let’s use the Australian term – mates).

Spearfishing clubs have to be commended for their work in education. Such indoctrination can only be done through clubs, and if over restrictive measures are taken they will not be followed, but broken in a regrettable manner.

The sport of spearfishing has saved many lives. Men have learned to obtain food and in emergency have learned to cope with tempestuous conditions to save their personal lives and the lives of others – in many cases to cooperate with authorities to retrieve bodies. There are quite a number of awards for bravery given to the risk of life.

The sport demands the utmost physical challenge and it has particular appeal to the adventurous young who are willing to be guided in balanced conservation by the leaders of their sport – but without the willing guidance of such sportsmen they would be rebellious!

When one considers the millions of tons of fish taken commercially, and compare this factor to the catch of spearfishermen in the occasional shallows which allows their sport, it seems the conservationists are using the sport of spearfishing as a target for the promotion of that cause, or their personal advocacy – rather than to achieve effective measures of fish preservation.

Yours faithfully

Don Linklater
Managing Director
Undersee Products Pty Ltd

From: Skindiving News from the Metropolitan Zone    Vol. 2 No 7 Jan 1976 Pg. 4

The Underwater Spearfishermans Association N.S.W. First Annual Picnic

SUNDAY 21 ST NOVEMBER, 1948

To be held at
Malabar Beach.

Events for the day Starting at 11.a.m.

No. 1 First Fish.
No. 2 Breath Holding Contest
No. 3 Underwater Target Shoot.

Lunch Adjournment

No. 4 Two hour Fishing Contest, for the greatest weight of Fish (other than Sharks and Sting Rays).

Prizes

1. For the Best Fish of the Day.
2. Largest Fish.
3. Best Bream.
4. Best Black Fish.
5. Best Groper.

Summary of fishing laws for the information of speargun fishermen operating on ocean beaches and saltwater streams of New South Wales

1959 1st December

SUMMARY OF FISHING LAWS FOR THE INFORMATION OF SPEARGUN FISHERMEN OPERATING ON OCEAN BEACHES AND SALTWATER STREAMS OF NEW SOUTH WALES

The following is a digest of the provisions of the New South Wales Fisheries laws as they apply to speargun fishermen operating in the tidal waters of New South Wales. Tidal waters are all streams affected by tidal influence and also include ocean beaches, coastal saltwater lakes, lagoons and ponds. The use of spears, spearguns and similar devices for the capture of fish is totally prohibited in inland waters.

Licences:

Persons taking fish by means of spears, spearguns or similar devices are not required to hold a licence.

Bag Limit:

There is no bag limit in respect of fish taken in saltwater except bass and all species of groper, but speargun fishermen are requested to avoid waste by ceasing to fish when they have obtained sufficient fish to satisfy their own requirements.

With bass, there is a bag limit of ten (10) fish per person per day but, as their capture is limited to a rod and line or handline with not more than two hooks attached, they cannot be legally captured by a speargun. The bag limit with groper of any species is not more than two (2) fish per person per day.

Sale of Fish:

Speargun fishermen are permitted to take fish for their own consumption and under no circumstances are they permitted to sell their catch. Continue reading Summary of fishing laws for the information of speargun fishermen operating on ocean beaches and saltwater streams of New South Wales

A major marine disturbance

1948 9th October

Yesterday’s piece about the feud between Manly’s rod fishermen and fish – spearers reveals much more than a mere ruffle on the angling waters. The feud shows signs of developing into a major marine disturbance.

The Amateur Fishermen’s Association has already hooked spearmen out of Tuggerah Lakes, Port Hacking and Wallis Lake, near Forster; now seeks to cast a wide and fine – meshed net to drag them out of metropolitan waters.

Neither side has much hope that a compromise plan – no spearing within 50 yards of an angler – will work out.

The anglers reckon that even at 50 yards the spearmen will scare the fish off. And that doesn’t take into account the apoplexy that the mere sight of a spearman tends to engender in their normally placid bloodstreams.

Each force has closed its ranks. Spearmen are busy organising themselves to stave off threats to their freedom; lobbyists from both camps are already employed trying to manoeuvre the political machinery their way. Trouble is there’s no provision for or against spearing in the Acts governing methods of fish capture.

Hasn’t been so much tension in Izaak Walton’s business since the introduction of the barbed hook.

From: The Sun 9/10/1948

Spearing is winter sport for surf men

1946 1st July

SPEARING FISH IS WINTER SPORT FOR SURF MEN

Fish – spearing is the latest craze among Coogee Surf Club members.
Even these cold mornings young Don Millar is in and under the water at daybreak, spearing fish for breakfast.

Millar yesterday was proclaimed champion of Coogee Surf club when he speared three fish (two morwong and a sergeant baker) in almost as many minutes.

1946 Spearing Fish is Winter Sport.Armed with spear gun, goggles and a lead belt that takes him to the sea bed, Millar always gets a catch.
He lies on the bottom to catch flathead and sergeant baker, and swims about to spear morwong and blackfish.
He dives from the rocks and swims out to about 25 feet of water.
He is not worried about sharks as he thinks they go to warmer water in the winter.

KNEW HIS FISH
Millar is getting to know his fish.
Every morning a 40 lb. drummer watches him at work.
Millar never takes a shot at him, as he is too strong and might swim off with his spear.
“Morwong and blackfish are the most curious fish”, said Millar.
“They will sit and take a look and will often swim up to me to see what is going on”.
Millar says under – water swimming gives him wonderful breath – control which he thinks will improve his swimming next season.
The spear gun is made of wood with brass fittings. It carries a long stainless unattached steel spear.
The spear is launched by a thick elastic band fired by a trigger.

From: Sydney Sun 6/7/46

Pioneer Spearman – The story of Jim Linquist

PIONEER SPEARMAN
This is the story of Jim Linquist By Ron Cox

When the war finished in 1945, Jim Linquist returned from the Islands to his home town of Cudgen, situated near the borders of Queensland and New South Wales. With his return he brought back a vast knowledge on the art of spearfishing.

Jim LinquistJim’s fondness for the rocky foreshores of the Cudgen Creek made him realise that, by the clarity of the water and the knowledge he had gained in the Islands, it was apparent the waters around his home town must contain fish worthy of spearing. The idea did not remain dormant and, in a short space of time, a very hurriedly – made set of equipment was forthcoming.

Continue reading Pioneer Spearman – The story of Jim Linquist

Review of Spearfishing Regulations in NSW

1996 May

REVIEW OF SPEARFISHING REGULATIONS IN NSW

The Minister for Fisheries, Bob Martin, today announced a review of spearfishing regulations in NSW. The review is consistent with my pre – election commitment to “Review the management arrangements of all major fisheries on a regular basis”. A review of spearfishing regulations has not been held in the last five years and a number of research, compliance, education and management issues regarding spearfishing in NSW need to be addressed.

The review will address the relevance of the existing spearfishing laws in NSW. The review will recommend, where necessary changes to laws to ensure the long term sustainability of fish stocks in NSW. The review should also ensure that a maximum number of fishers can enjoy the sport and contribute to an equitable distribution of the catch. The review should ensure that spearfishing laws are, as far as possible, consistent across the state, easily enforceable and understood.

A committee of spearers, industry representatives and NSW Fisheries staff has been formed to oversee the review. The review committee has the appropriate knowledge to comment on the current regulations and to represent a broad cross section of the diving community.
A discussion paper and questionnaire on the major recommendations will be prepared and distributed for comment.

There is a need to implement fishery regulations that are effective, based on sound research data, and have broad community acceptance. I urge all spearfishers and members of the community to participate in the review.

Bag Limit on Red Morwong

1974 31st August

BAG LIMIT ON RED MORWONGRed Morwong At a previous meeting of the Amateur Fishermen’s Advisory Council, council was advised that representations made by the NSW Underwater Federation regarding the imposition of a bag limit on red morwong would be investigated.

Council was advised that these investigations had been completed and action was being taken to introduce a bag limit of five red morwong per person per day.

From: Information Sheet A.F.A.C meeting 31/8/1974

Camp at Bass Point, Shellharbour

1950 September

CAMP AT BASS POINT, SHELLHARBOR

A camp will be held at Bass point, over the 8 Hour week-end, everyone is invited. A marque will be put up for those who cannot supply their own tent. It is essential for us to know how many is coming, and who is coming by train, as we will meet two trains only. The trains leave Central, Friday 29th September at 7.27 p.m., arrive Shellharbour 10.41 p.m. Saturday 30th September, leaves 8.08 a.m. arrives Shellharbour 11. 08 a.m.

All supplies for the week-end must be taken as there are no shops. There are excellent Fishing Grounds, and you can get a lee out of the wind any time.

So come along, one and all! !

Yours sincerely

The Underwater Spear-Fishermen’s Association of N.S.W.

Man Spears Tiger Shark Underwater

The first spearfishing competition and Jach Egan with the first Trophy awarded to a Spearfisher. – Mel Brown

Underwater fisherman Jack Egan, of Potts Point, yesterday speared a six-foot tiger shark in 10 feet of water at La Perouse beach.

The President Dick Charles Trophy The Underwater Fishermans Assoc of NSW For the best fish of the day 17 Oct 1948 won by Jack Egan
The President
Dick Charles Trophy
The Underwater Fishermans Assoc of NSW
For the best fish of the day 17 Oct 1948
won by Jack Egan

Egan was one of a party of 20 members of the Underwater Spearfishermen’s Association of N.S.W. which had dived into the sea of the rocks at the northern end of La Perouse Bay in search of prey.

All the fishermen wore swimming trunks and carried sling spearguns.

Two hundred yards from the rocks Egan submerged and swam slowly above the sea bed. “Through the water, I saw the tiger cruising along the bottom,” he said later.

“He was a nasty brute.”

Egan aimed his gun at the shark and fired. The spear , with a line attached, pierced the
shark behind the gills.

Jack Egan
Jack Egan

Egan swam to the surface and called to two other speannen who were swimming nearby. One of them, Les Gleeson, swam over to Egan and helped him pull the shark towards the shore.

“The tiger was threshing the water as we got close to the rocks,” said Gleeson.

“We hauled him up on the rocks and finished him off.”

Gleeson, a committee member of the association, said a cup was to be awarded for the largest game speared during the day.

“Jack Egan will certainly get that cup,” he said. “He is the first member of the association to spear a shark.”

From: News report Sunday 21“ November 1948